LATEST NEWS

I Regret Creating SARS In 1984 — Former CP Fulani Kwafaja

A retired Commissioner of Police, Fulani Kwajafa, has expressed regrets for establishing the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) of the Nigeria Police Force. . . Kwajafa while speaking in an interview with BBC Hausa said the unit had completey derailed from its founding objectives. . . “I entered the Nigeria Police Force in 1984. Then robbery was prevalent. Buhari, the then Head of State, got a lot of complaint. He told me and Mr Inyang, the then IGP, that we must do something about it or be fired. . . Mr Inyang called me and told me to come up with a plan to save the country from thieves, so I said okay. . . After four months of creating SARS, there was peace, those who were not caught ran, and those who were caught were sent to prison. . . This thing frustrates me, there is no reason why because someone commits a crime that the person should be killed. There are laws and no one will give an order that if you see armed robbers kill the person. . . I’ve been hearing disheartening news, to the extent that…

US Issues Warning To Their Citizens In Nigeria

The U.S. Department of State has released a statement warning their Citizens in/coming to Nigeria, to consider their own personal security by avoiding some states due to the security situation in northeast Nigeria. The statement warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travelling to Nigeria and recommends that U.S. citizens should especially avoid travelling to Adamawa, Borno & Yobe. Except for essential matters.

Other states that are to be avoided due to the risk of kidnappings, robberies, and other armed attacks are: Bauchi, Bayelsa, Delta, Edo, Gombe, Imo, Jigawa, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Kebbi, Kogi, Niger, Plateau, Rivers, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

States in the Northeast are to be avoided because the security situation in northeast remains 'fluid and unpredictable'. The statement explained that the ability of the Mission in Nigeria to provide assistance to U.S. citizens in Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe states remains severely limited. All U.S. citizens are to be particularly vigilant around government security facilities; churches, mosques, and other places of worship; locations where large crowds may gather, such as hotels, clubs, bars, restaurants, markets, shopping malls; and other areas frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers.

"Security measures in Nigeria remain heightened due to threats posed by extremist groups, and U.S. citizens may encounter police and military checkpoints, additional security, and possible road blocks throughout the country. All U.S. citizens should remain aware of current situations including curfews, travel restrictions, and states of emergency in the areas they are in or plan to visit.

"Kidnappings remain a security concern throughout the country. Criminal elements throughout Nigeria orchestrate kidnappings for ransom; Islamic extremists, operating predominantly in the North, also have been known to conduct kidnappings. Criminals or militants have abducted foreign nationals, including U.S. citizens, from off-shore and land-based oil facilities, residential compounds, airports, and public roadways.

"Militant groups have destroyed oil production infrastructure in Bayelsa and Delta states. U.S. citizens are advised to avoid the areas of these states where these incidents have occurred. Attacks by pirates off the coast of Nigeria in the Gulf of Guinea have increased substantially in recent years. Armed gangs have boarded both commercial and private vessels to rob travelers. The Nigerian Navy has limited capacity to respond to criminal acts at sea."

Comments